Ruin and Restoration

So sorry! I’m really far behind on these posts. I’ve been crazy busy. Lots of French lessons with Natacha . . .

Natacha, Stéphane and their son, Solal

. . . who FINALLY let me take her picture, although she kept trying to hide behind Solal!

Also, I’ve been doing as much homework as I can get her to give me and creating my own when I don’t have enough from her. (Yes, I’m THAT kind of student.) I am here partly to improve my French after all.

Plus, there have been lunches, apéros, dinners, concerts, day-trips, and I just got back from an overnight with Pascale and Jacky down to Cap Ferret, Arcachon and environs. But I don’t want to miss sharing a few more photos of beautiful Bretagne (where Stéphane is from, by the way, though further north than where we were). So without further ado, here is Bretagne, Part 4.

Rochefort-en-Terre

Saturday, the 25th of May, we went inland. One of my favorite spots was the beautiful little village of Rochefort-en-Terre, where first we toured the grounds of the Château de Rochefort-en-Terre. Below is a shot looking down on the town from the grounds of the château.

Rochefort-en-Terre — Love these old rooftops and the sun-kissed hillside in the distance.

It made me think about how wonderfully photogenic these old buildings are and what a responsibility it is to maintain them. But look how beautiful the main square is . . . .

Place du Puits, Rochefort-en-Terre, Bretagne

Later in the afternoon we stopped here . . .

Forteresse de Largoët

The 14th century octagonal keep you see on the left was the only building open, so Pascale and I climbed up the tiniest, creepiest, dim staircase–my fault, the beginning of the larger baron’s staircase looked darker at the beginning. But never mind, we made it up VERY high until I started noticing random wooden supports for ENORMOUS stones and sections of wall that would otherwise tumble down. The floors were already long gone, burned, I think, or rotted away or both. I decided this ruin had not  yet been restored quite enough to make me comfortable four of five stories above ground with tons of stone precariously perched around me. Pascale was unfazed, but I decided to climb back down tout de suite (NOW).

I’ll leave you with another gem, the Château de  Trédion . . .

Château de Trédion

. . . that we were not able to see up close, because a wedding had taken over the place. Not a bad setting for a fairy-tale wedding!

It takes years and years and LOTS of funding, as I’m sure you can imagine, to restore and maintain these treasures. Of course, all good things, if they are to remain good things, require care and attention. I am so grateful for those willing and able to do what it takes.

Wishing you beautiful things–and more importantly, relationships–worth caring for and the motivation and resources to do so!

8 thoughts on “Ruin and Restoration”

  1. So it looks like I’d give you an A+ so far on this trip, for the fun factor, the photography, your bravery, for doing new learning and of course for your amazing way with words, communicating and sharing this wonderful experience with all of us!!!

    1. What!?! No A+ for my impressive daily step count?!? Guess I haven’t mentioned it lately. 😉 I’m definitely getting at least my 10,000 a day, often a lot more. I know you, one of my sportiest friends, will give me a thumbs up for that, since it’s such a big improvement over my usual in recent years. Seriously, thank you for your kind comments, for making me feel I’m still connected to dear ones in other places, and thus never alone.

  2. Beautiful thoughts and photos. Glad you decided to return to the safety of the ground at the keep. Love you.

  3. Love your photos! I am enjoying following your journey… but I’m looking for those travel sketches… Stop and smell the roses. Keep up the art!
    Paula at SandLily Studio…

    1. I promise I did BRING art supplies, and I have done a little sketching (okay only two little ink sketches), but I’ll try to fit in a few more. I’m super focused on improving my French, so that tends to push everything else a bit lower on the priority list. Thanks for the reminder of the value of slowing down!

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